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FESTIVAL MARQUEE 
Sat 24 Sept / 20.00-21.30
 / £12-15

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Lionel Shriver
ABOMINATIONS

A masterful new essay collection from the cultural iconoclast and award-winning author of We Need To Talk About KevinAbominations is the first collection of essays from the inimitable Lionel Shriver – the award-winning author and one of the most acclaimed writers of our time. She will be in conversation with JICAS Director, Sean Dettman.

Uniting essays from the Spectator, New York Times, Harper’s magazine, Wall Street Journal, the Guardian and more, this compelling compilation also features never-before-published writing from the columnist, social satirist and novelist.

Abominations showcases Lionel Shriver’s relentlessly sceptical and deeply insightful thoughts on our contemporary era. A timely synthesis of Shriver’s expansive work, this is an unmissable collection from a daring and provocative writer.

‘The woman can’t write an unintelligent sentence ... Shriver has something of the John Updike or Patricia Highsmith eye’ - The Times

‘Thought-provoking, timely, and extremely funny’Metro‘ [A] brutally fearless writer’ - iPaper

‘Shriver remains a formidably sharp writer, one of the best we have’ - Evening Standard

‘I think Shriver’s novels are wonderful... fun, smart and, perhaps because of their author’s unconventional political views, unlike anything else you’ll read’ - Financial Times

A widely published journalist, Lionel Shriver is the author of fifteen novels, including the New York Times bestsellers So Much for That  (a finalist for the 2010 National Book Award and the Wellcome Trust Book Prize) and The Post-Birthday World (Entertainment Weekly’s 2007 Book of the Year). Winner of the 2005 Orange prize, the international bestseller We Need to Talk About Kevin was adapted for a feature film by Lynne Ramsay in 2011. Lionel Shriver won the BBC National Short Story award in 2014. The Mandibles: A Family, 2029–2047, was a Sunday Times top ten bestseller in 2016, The Motion of the Body Through Space was published to critical acclaim in 2020 and Shriver’s work has been translated into 28 languages.